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Can you please tell me which one of the following two sentences is right, and why?

He is robbed off a huge amount of money? OR He is robbed of a huge amount of money?

Also, is the comma here necessary? -> Can you please tell me which one of the following two sentences is right, and why?

Thanks in advance. This is my first question, and the site has been hugely helpful to me so far. You are doing a great job.

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    Think disposed of, relieved of, get rid of, ..., not off. – Kris Feb 3 '14 at 7:56
  • Without the comma, it's one question; with it, it's two questions in one. – Kris Feb 3 '14 at 7:57
  • That was very helpful! – user64507 Feb 4 '14 at 6:23
  • People upvoting such questions might think they're being nice to new visitors, but they're doing the site a disservice. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 14 '16 at 22:41
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The comma is helpful in making it clear to the reader that you don't mean 'right and why' where you're treating the interrogative as an adjective, but are asking a new question, the content of which is clear from the antecedent.

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"Robbed of," and your comma looks unnecessary but permissible to me.

  • But why? Why? :) – Kris Feb 3 '14 at 7:59
  • Answers need to be well supported, else it amounts to giving an opinion or making a comment. – Kris Feb 3 '14 at 8:00
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"He was (past tense) robbed of a huge amount of money."

off (away) vs. of (separation).

Can you please tell me which one of the following two sentences is right(,) and why?

The comma isn't necessary.

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    Why past tense? Why can't the present tense work here? – Kris Feb 3 '14 at 7:58
  • Oh, sorry. present tense works too. – amateur Feb 3 '14 at 8:12

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