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Is there a specific difference between the nouns "strip" and "stripe", especially in the context of "a strip(e) of paper"? Are both equivalent or do they carry specific meanings?

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    A stripe is "a long narrow band or strip, typically of the same width throughout its length, differing in color or texture from the surface on either side of it", and a strip is a "a long, narrow piece of cloth, paper, plastic, or some other material". – user63241 Jan 27 '14 at 18:21
  • @SanathDevalapurkar not so different, then? Feel free to answer :D – yankeekilo Jan 27 '14 at 18:46
  • I'll post it as an answer, then. – user63241 Jan 27 '14 at 18:47
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    A stripe is a continuous constant-width wide line (or wider) on a surface. A strip is a long thin piece by itself. A strip can have stripes on it, but the other way. – Mitch Jan 29 '14 at 3:39
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A stripe is "a long narrow band or strip, typically of the same width throughout its length, differing in color or texture from the surface on either side of it", and a strip is a "a long, narrow piece of cloth, paper, plastic, or some other material".

These two definitions are not very different from each other, but one must take into consideration the fact that a stripe is in fact a strip with a color or texture difference from the surface (in this case, paper) on the other side of one side of the paper. (Being a mathematician, I can't help but add - these definitions are not accurate for a Mobius strip!).

Reference: Strip, Stripe. 2013. Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. 27 January, 2014.

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    A strip can exist independently of other objects/surfaces; a stripe is a feature of some other substrate. Confusingly, a strip (of cloth, for instance) can be used to form a stripe (on a uniform, for example). – MT_Head Jan 27 '14 at 19:03
  • @MT_Head: That's true, and as I've written in my answer, "a stripe is in fact a strip with a color or texture difference from the paper on the other side of one side of the paper". – user63241 Jan 27 '14 at 19:10
  • Would you mind augmenting your answer with some references (dictionaries etc.)? – yankeekilo Jan 27 '14 at 19:52
  • @YvesKlett: This definition has been obtained from Oxford dictionaries. – user63241 Jan 27 '14 at 20:15
  • Please cite your sources for quotations (with a link, if available, otherwise a bibliographic citation). Answers should not contain unsourced quotations. – Bradd Szonye Jan 29 '14 at 0:47
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"strip" has several meanings. One meaning describes the form of something: something that is long and small. You can speak of a strip of paper, cloth, metal or a strip of land, as already said.

"stripe" is a colour design. A shirt can have stripes, a flag can have stripes. The US-American flag is called "Stars and Stripes".

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