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I attended x institute for almost ten years. Last year I completed an advanced book entitled Landmark. Taking the advice of one of my teachers, I enrolled at another institute for a teacher training course.

I used to go x institute for almost ten years. Last year I competed an advanced book entitled Landmark. Taking the advice of one of my teachers, I enrolled at another institute for a teacher training course.

Which version is better?

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    The verb 'go' is rarely transitive. You certainly can't 'go an institute'. 'Go to' and 'attend' are synonymous (have usages conveying the same sense). This does not mean they are always interchangeable, though they are here. Actually, the temporal ('for almost ten years' requires 'I went to'). Jan 26, 2014 at 17:38
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    I.e, the second example is ungrammatical, but the first is OK. You can't use used to with a durative temporal expression using for, as @EdwinAshworth points out. Jan 26, 2014 at 17:53
  • Replace "used to go" with "went to" if you want to use the verb go in there. "I went to Belgrade Institute for almost ten years."
    – GEdgar
    Jan 26, 2014 at 18:49
  • @John, surely not ungrammatical—just temporally quite problematical in this case. “I used to go to school for three hours every morning” is perfectly fine, but of course, to make a ‘habit’ out of doing something for ten whole years, one would have to be very old. Jan 26, 2014 at 19:36
  • As you prefer; I would award a ?*, personally. Jan 26, 2014 at 19:42

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The first is better, though there is some lack of cohesion between the ideas presented.

Suggested minor tweaks:

I attended x institute for nearly ten years. Then last year, after reading a book entitled "Landmark" and following the advice of one of my teachers, I enrolled at another institute to attend a teacher training course.

Notes:

  • "advanced book" is somewhat meaningless and can be effectively reduced to just "book" unless you provide additional context. What was advanced about it? Difficult to read, etc.
  • Use of the word "Then" to start the next sentence provides sequence
  • Merging of reading the book and following the advice, allows the reader to flow to the next primary action - enrolling at another institute
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