1

So, I want to title a talk.

Which of these is the right usage and why?

"Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them"

OR

"Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solving them"

6
  • Essentially this same question is covered here: english.stackexchange.com/questions/384/…
    – Chris
    Aug 20, 2010 at 9:08
  • 2
    One doesn't normally solve a paradigm.
    – delete
    Aug 20, 2010 at 9:08
  • Shinto, Would you rather like me to use the word "dealing" then?
    – lprsd
    Aug 20, 2010 at 9:17
  • Incidentally, I'd say "Djangonic" rather than "Djangoic" - it reads better, and echoes "Pythonic" (even though there's an 'n' at the end of 'Python' and not of 'Django'). Aug 20, 2010 at 9:28
  • Daniel, Nice to see you here. I am waiting for some English expert to question, what Django has got to do with Python and why an 'n' has to be added to djangoic, to sound like pythonic :)
    – lprsd
    Aug 20, 2010 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

3

The construction is typically "approach to [noun]". The gerund can be used in place of a noun here, as it can in many other situations.

The infinitive should not be used. It is something of a coincidence that the infinitive has the prepended word "to", and that "to" is the appropriate preposition to use after "approach" here.

So to be clear, the following is correct:

"Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solving them"

1
  • 1
    Agree. It seems to me that the most common time you have a noun infinitive combination is when the noun is really the object of the verb: "miles to go", "heck to pay", "mountain to climb". In this sense, a pilot might speak of an approach to fly, which is very different from an approach to flying.
    – moioci
    Aug 21, 2010 at 3:06
3

For me, the first (""Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them") is not possible, for the reason Noldorin gave. Also, it reads oddly without an article before "Djangoic".

0

They are equivalently correct. But if you want to sound expensive and impressive, use the gerund form.

1
  • 1
    Er, the gerund doesn't sound especially pretentious here.
    – ptomato
    Aug 20, 2010 at 9:11

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.