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I just saw someone write that they were a "die heart" fan. I always thought the term was supposed to be "die hard" but I decided to google it just in case I was wrong.

Google was unable to give me a definitive answer as there were folk on both sides of the fence. Anyone know the true answer?

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  • lololol! There is a forum for movies in stackexchange, you know. – Blessed Geek Jan 20 '14 at 4:07
  • @congusbongus Right, I gathered that there are plenty of people using the term 'die heart'. Your reference makes it look like that is a variant of 'die hard' with references to when people have used it that way. So I wonder whether this is a case where people have used it the wrong way long enough that it's now considered correct? – BVernon Jan 20 '14 at 4:22
  • @BVernon, Do you recall the percentages in each instance? – Michael Owen Sartin Jan 20 '14 at 4:25
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    @BVernon it's an eggcorn. – congusbongus Jan 20 '14 at 4:32
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I think "diehard," "die hard," and "dieheart" are all different.

diehard |ˈdīˌhärd| noun [ often as modifier ] a person who strongly opposes change or who continues to support something in spite of opposition: diehard traditionalists | she was a diehard Yankees fan. ORIGIN mid 19th cent.: from die hard (see die1) .

"Die hard" is a phrase, not a word.

PHRASES die hard – disappear or change very slowly: old habits die hard.

"Die heart" is nonexistent in a legitimate dictionary, so all we can do is consult definitions that may have been randomly fabricated.

As Kris defined from UrbanDictionary:

One who is ridiculously overwhelmingly passionate about a specific thing, person, place, verb, or adverb. One willing to die for said cause, and as a result their heart would stop beating. She was a dieheart about the consumption of breakfast cereals. Thus meaning that she valued the consumption of breakfast cereals with great integrity.

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    I don't think you're wrong. I think my mistake was making it two words instead of a single one, otherwise I would have found it in the dictionary and that would have settled it :) – BVernon Jan 20 '14 at 21:44
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die heart, also dieheart
Informal, after the expression die hard, esp., in contrast, not as a synonym/ variant.

See UD dieheart:

One who is ridiculously overwhelmingly passionate about a specific thing, person, place, verb, or adverb. One willing to die for said cause, and as a result their heart would stop beating.
She was a dieheart about the consumption of breakfast cereals. Thus meaning that she valued the consumption of breakfast cereals with great integrity.

cf. UD 2. die hard:

It means when you are determined to do something, similarly like Bruce Willis in the film Die Hard.
Can be used as a verb or a noun.

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  • A verb or a noun? "He challenged us to diehard the marathon"?? – GEdgar Jan 20 '14 at 14:41
  • @GEdgar Doesn't work as a noun either, haha. That's what you get from urban dictionary though :) – BVernon Jan 20 '14 at 21:50
  • @GEdgar Any noun can generally be 'verbed' (these days). Why blame urban dictionary? – Kris Jan 21 '14 at 5:46

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