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Does the following sentence make use of parallel structure:

"Thus, Soyster’s diction most definitely exemplifies how he views himself in a dreary and pitiful manner and Mairs’s diction, contrariwise to Soyster’s, exemplifies how she views herself in a pleasant and benign manner."

If not, could you tell me how I can make it have parallel structure. I am very bad with English, and more mathematically inclined, so please break things down.

Thanks for the help.

  • Why do you want this complex sentence to make use of parallel structure? Are you sure you know what parallel structure actually means? From that Wikipedia link - Parallel: She likes to cook, jog, and read, or She likes cooking, jogging, and reading. Non-parallel: She likes cooking, jogging, and to read. – FumbleFingers Jan 18 '14 at 22:17
  • The question isn't why; I just need to know whether it uses parallel structure. The reason for my doubts is the "contrariwise to Soyster's" part. – user62726 Jan 18 '14 at 22:24
  • It just means opposite to Soyster's diction. – nxx Jan 18 '14 at 22:27
  • I know what it means, but does that subordinate clause corrupt the eminent parallel structure? – user62726 Jan 18 '14 at 22:29
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    You can't corrupt a structure; you can vary it, and it's done all the time. Unless you have some definition of "eminent parallel structure" that specifies every possible variation in advance, you'd better allow normal syntactic and pragmatic processes to happen. Otherwise I have no idea what you're talking about. – John Lawler Jan 19 '14 at 3:33
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Yes - the structure here is strongly parallel. The words don't have to match exactly.

"Soyster's diction exemplifies ... how he views himself in a dreary and pitiful manner"

is parallel to:

"Mairs's diction exemplifies ... how she views herself in a pleasant and benign manner".

An example of a non-parallel version might be:

"Soyster's diction exemplifies how he views himself in a dreary and pitiful manner, while Mairs's diction indicates a pleasant and benign self-image."

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