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I want to say that the data is not like 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159 but can be 154, 156, 157, 159. How do I negate the word "consecutive"? I was not able to find it in the dictionary. I have found both variants but the resource is not very reliable.

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    Have you checked the two possible words in the dictionary? – Kris Jan 16 '14 at 14:51
  • @Kris have you read my question? – Tomas Jan 16 '14 at 16:45
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    @Tomas: Using an unreliable dictionary isn't really using a dictionary, is it? – MrHen Jan 16 '14 at 17:21
  • Did you mention some dictionary? I don't see any. google.com/#q=consecutive+antonym – Kris Jan 17 '14 at 7:29
5

The generally accepted version of the word is nonconsecutive, especially where numbers are concerned.

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  • Thanks, that's a good news for me, because I have to use it in sentence with "in", and "in inconsecutive years" would sound really strange :-) – Tomas Jan 16 '14 at 14:18
  • Generally if it sounds strange to say out loud, it's probably wrong. – Ilythya Jan 16 '14 at 14:24
  • -1 What is the source of this 'information'? – Kris Jan 17 '14 at 7:29
2

When looking for a more reliable resource, check out the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) and the British National Corpus (BNC):

                   COCA     BNC

nonconsecutive      22       0
non-consecutive      3       2
unconsecutive        1       0
inconsecutive        0       1

Do note that due to the relatively small corpus size, BNC won't always be clear in its verdict — as indeed it isn't too clear in this particular case —, so make sure to check both corpora. Especially when writing for an international audience.

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  • +1 That is because of the context that each fits appropriately into. Most of the time we do mean non-consecutive, not inconsecutive. (You see they do not mean quite the same thing.) – Kris Jan 17 '14 at 7:34

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