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I was writing to someone and I had below line using "just in case"

"I have done blah blah blah..., just in case they need to be so and so..."

I was wondering if this the right way of using it?

or should it be

"I have done blah blah blah..., just in case if they needs to be so and so..."

Please suggest!!

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    There's a dated/archaic form if/lest/in case it needs be [blah blah], where to never occurs. But you obviously don't want that - in your case it's definitely in case they need to be [blah blah] (the word just is entirely optional, and doesn't meaningfully add anything to the utterance). Commented Jan 15, 2014 at 17:11
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    ‘If’ basically means the same as ‘in case’ here, so having them both there is like saying, “Just if if they need…” or “Just in case in case they need…”. Commented Jan 15, 2014 at 17:27
  • The second one should be either "... they need ..." or "... there needs ..." but not "... they needs ....". Commented Jan 15, 2014 at 18:13
  • I think the second form (with the superfluos "if") is used often in speech, if not correctly, to imply that the conditional is even more unlikely. Commented Jan 15, 2014 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

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The phrase "just in case" or simply "in case" has an implied meaning of "in [the] case [that]", which is why it can be followed up by "they need to be so and so". Adding the "if" turns the phrase to "just in [the] case [that] if they need to be so and so", which isn't right.

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Your original usage is, in my opinion, the correct usage of the term presented and I think your should keep it at that and not use the second option.

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It seems to me that the phrase "just in case..." is short for "just in the case that...", as expanded below:

"I have done blah blah blah..., just in [the] case [that] they need to be so and so..."

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