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I've heard someone say "Here's my one" instead of "Here's mine". Is the former grammatical? It seems like it's a shortcut for "Here's one that is mine".

  • No, it is not correct if the meaning "Here's mine" is implied. It would be correct with some other meaning like "Here's my one-dollar bill". – Vilmar Jan 10 '14 at 12:42
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    @Vilmar I don't see what is incorrect about it. 'You don't have an umbrella with you?. Well, if you need to go out use my one'. It is not used as often as 'mine', but I don't see what's wrong with it. After all 'mine' is simply an abbreviation of 'my one'. – WS2 Jan 10 '14 at 12:48
  • "Here's my one" means "Here's the one that is mine" rather than just any of the articles in question that I possess. – Andrew Leach Jan 10 '14 at 12:49
  • I'd say that, as 'Here are my two / three / four / ...' are all perfectly acceptable, arguing that 'Here is my one' isn't acceptable for 'Here is mine; I only have the one' is very dubious. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 10 '14 at 13:24
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It isn't a very common usage but it would technically be grammatically correct.

Where are your crayons? Here is mine.

Where are your crayons? Here is my crayon.

Where are your crayons? Here is my crayons.

Where are your crayons? Here are my two crayons.

Where are your crayons? Here is my one crayon.

Where are your crayons? Here is my one.

Where are your crayons? Here are my two.

The last two examples sound very strange to my ear and I would never use them. But I am unaware of a rule that dictates they are improper.

  • "Here is my crayons" should be "Here are my crayons" surely? – DavidPostill Apr 2 '18 at 16:48

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