1

Any changes in scope will be addressed during this meeting.

or

Any changes of scope will be addressed during this meeting.

or

Any changes to (the) scope will be addressed during this meeting.

Proposition madness! I believe that I can make a case for each choice, but what does the board think?

My intuition is that if one chooses the "to" preposition then I would have to include "the" before "scope," whereas "the" could be omitted from the first two options.

Thoughts?

2
  • 1
    Welcome to EL&U. Proposition madness might occur during long weekends of constitution planning, but here we like to think we're fact-based. ;) I would go with changes in scope. – anongoodnurse Jan 7 '14 at 22:59
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    @Susan: So would I - "any changes in the scope" about four times more common in Google Books than to the (where of [the] is far less common). I wouldn't include the unless it was something like changes in the scope of the project. Which seemed to me to be a general tendency in Google Books. – FumbleFingers Jan 7 '14 at 23:58
1

The most common preposition in this context is "in":

Any changes in scope will be addressed during this meeting.

"Of" would be an acceptable but uncommon alternative. The third is very unlikely.

0

There's always "Scope Changes" to let you avoid the issue entirely.

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