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Do I need a comma before "particularly" in the case below? Thank you very much for your help!

Vitamin D has properties against metabolic, neoplastic, and immune disorders particularly breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

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    Yes. You don't need the comma before if, however. – RegDwigнt Jan 6 '14 at 15:35
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    And arguably it should be 'whether' to avoid ambiguity. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 6 '14 at 15:43
  • Alternatively, you could use a colon instead of a comma, correct? – Doc Jan 6 '14 at 20:51
  • @Doc, not if the word following the colon is "particularly". – anongoodnurse Jan 7 '14 at 3:03
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This sentence had raised a question in my mind. Vitamin D has what property against metabolic, neoplastic and immune disorders..... I think it is better to be specific and clear. May be this sentence can be better rephrased as "Vitamin D has prophylactic/preventive/therapeuti effect against metabolic......"

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Vitamin D has properties against metabolic, neoplastic, and immune disorders particularly breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

As mentioned, you do need the comma before particularly. However, Vitamin D does not have properties against. It may have protective effects against...

We know how it protects against osteoporosis, but not the other disease processes you mentioned.

If you want to keep properties, I would say

Vitamin D has properties protecting against metabolic, neoplastic, and immune disorders, particularly breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

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Vitamin D has properties against metabolic, neoplastic, and immune disorders particularly breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

Yes, you need a comma before the particlarly. On another note, the phrase "Vitamin D has properties against ..." strikes me as awkward and unwieldy because of the phrase "has properties against". Consider rewording, e.g. "has properties preventing metabolic,...".

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