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Are these both grammatically correct? "ON September 23 through 26, 2013, birds were observed on the lake." or "FROM September 23 through 26, 2013, birds were observed on the lake."

  • I don't know about "grammatically", but idiomatically, only ON is used for single specific dates, just as only AT is used for single specific times. – FumbleFingers Jan 3 '14 at 19:16
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    "On September 23 through 26" sounds odd to me. I'm not sure whether it's correct, but it does imply to me that on each day throughout that range, birds were observed. "From" would mean that birds were observed within the range. "From September 23 through 26" sounds odd too, though; you would usually use "to" rather than "through". – cHao Jan 3 '14 at 19:16
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They are correct, with different implications. The first sentence, using 'on', implies that the event (birds being seen) occurred individually on each of those days. The second, using 'from', implies that the seeing of birds was continuous through the entire duration.

A better pair of examples: "On September 23rd through the 26th, we will be going out to lunch." "From September 23rd through the 26th, we will be on vacation."

That said, the implication is by no means definitive; 'from' could just as well be used in the first example and still be correct.

  • Oh! I hadn't noticed OP's second comma. I thought both versions were telling us that a total of 2013 birds were observed. (This question is so last year! :) – FumbleFingers Jan 3 '14 at 19:19

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