2

For example, method 1 of doing something (say A) requires something else (say B). And I invented method 2 to do A but without the prerequisite of B. I can say:

The disadvantage of method 1 is its requirement/need of B.

Now I want to introduce my method by saying

the advantage of my method 2 is its (the phrase).

What should I put in there to represent the meaning of "no requirement/need of B"?

I don't choose to say "the advantage of my method 2 is that it doesn't require B" because I want to also introduce other advantages, like "the advantage of my method 2 is its speed, efficiency, and … ". What should I put here?

  • 2
    ... the fact that ... (You also need 'advantages'.) – Edwin Ashworth Jan 1 '14 at 0:35
  • Welcome to EL&U, james. :) – anongoodnurse Jan 1 '14 at 1:37
1

The word "obviate" may sound a bit out of place, but you could try this.

"The advantage of my method 2 is it obviates B."

or

"The advantage of my method 2 is its speed, efficiency, and obviation of B."

You also have the option of this semi-quick-and-dirty line:

"The advantage of my method 2 is its speed, efficiency, and lack of B as a requirement."
  • Welcome to EL&U, jsng. We appreciate your input. :) – anongoodnurse Jan 1 '14 at 4:11
0

The advantage of my method 2 is that it...

  • makes "B" redundant (or superfluous).
  • moots "B" (or makes "B" moot).
  • eliminates the contingency on "B".
  • takes "B" out of the picture.
0

I think the natural choice is elimination. You could use its elimination of B, its elimination of the need of B or its elimination of the prerequisite of B. But they are all too wordy.

If you want a concise sentence, I recommend to rephrase it, and use either fewer steps or fewer prerequisites instead.

The advantage of my method 2 is its fewer steps, speed, efficiency, and … ".

-1

Method 2 removes the requirement for B and has the advantage of ....

  • This is more of a "comment" than an answer, the probable reason for your downvote. – anongoodnurse Jan 1 '14 at 1:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.