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What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence?

As an example, which of the following ways is correct:

  1. Similarly to yesterday, and opposed to tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.
  2. Similarly to yesterday, and as opposed to tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.
  3. Similarly to yesterday, but opposed to tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.
  4. Similarly to yesterday, but as opposed to tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.
  5. Like yesterday and unlike tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.
  6. Like yesterday but unlike tomorrow, we are eating dinner together tonight.

I know that like/unlike are not supposed to be used in case of comparing clauses, or am I mistaken?

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  • There is no rule against the number of words per sentence, but it is advisable to limit each sentence to conveying a single "message". Sentences that try to convey multiple messages are problematic to the speaker and listener. It doesn't sound natural, that's why it isn't prevalent in common speech. If you're a lawyer then that's different because your aim is to obfuscate rather than to be clear.
    – Sam
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 5:25

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I am unaware of any reason not to use like and unlike in the way in which you have used them here. I'd probably go with "Like yesterday, but unlike tomorrow, we will be eating together tonight."

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  • Although something like 'We are dining together tonight, just as we did yesterday. Tomorrow, we won't be,' would sound far more normal (at least in this example). Perhaps there are examples where the contrasting phrases sound better next to each other (finding good examples can be very tricky). Commented Dec 29, 2013 at 19:57

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