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I wonder if it is correct to say the following to mean Mr.XXX was my mentor and helped me in learning the book. Could you suggest a better equivalent for what I am trying to say? To explain it better, I've taken a course and Mr.XXX is the teacher and the book (called YY, for example) is my course book.

I studied the book with Mr.XXX as my mentor/tutor/teacher.

  • Were you actually studying the book? Or was the book simply the textbook used in the class? and how formal are you trying to be here? In casual conversation with classmates I'd probably say, "Yeah, we used Salas and Hille for Cooper' Calc class too." – Jim Dec 29 '13 at 19:53
  • @Jim: Yes, I studied the book. It wasn't a public class, a class with about four or five students where the teacher or mentor used to read some pages of the book and explain it afterwards. It's a autobiography, formal context. – Gigili Jan 7 '14 at 16:10
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A typical saying would use "under":

I studied the book under Mr. XXX.

"Under" in this context suggests that Mr. XXX was a mentor or teacher of some sort and there was an explicit purpose in studying that particular book. This usage is mostly used to refer to entire subjects:

I studied mathematics under Mr. XXX.

But the saying would be understood with an individual work:

I studied Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid under Mr. XXX.


If you want to more explicitly note Mr. XXX's role as a teacher you could say:

I studied the book in Mr. XXX's course.

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"I studied YY in Mr.XXX's course."

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