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1) If, for whatever reason, you don’t think the quoted price is legitimate, please kindly inform us of your target price. Our sales teams would be glad to work around your budget.
2) If, for whatever reason, you don’t think the quoted price is legitimate, please kindly inform us of your target price, our sales teams would be glad to work around your budget.

Please kindly advise on the use of comma in the above two sentences. Any help appreciated.

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  • I feel a bit strange (non-native) to see a price defined "legitimate". Is this right ? Not sure what "legitimization" has to do with a price. Maybe it is meant that the price is too high, or disproportionate (or what is the right adjective) ?
    – Pam
    Commented Jul 14, 2014 at 0:48

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The second version is a classical example of a comma splice, which some also consider a run-on-sentence.

It is not grammatically wrong (punctuation is not about grammar), but rather poor stylistically. Separate sentence should be separate, especially if your sentence already is long to begin with. The latter Wikipedia link also offers other remedies such as a semicolon or a coordinating conjunction. In your case, I recommend a simple period.

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    Can't imagine for the life of me, why you received a downvote. Plus one from me. Don Commented Dec 21, 2013 at 16:35
  • Excuse me me. Should it not be: "grammar is not about punctuation" ? Why is the other way around in this answer. Is this ok ?
    – Pam
    Commented Jul 14, 2014 at 0:50

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