2

Suppose I have a work to accomplish today, but I am not in the mood to finish it. I need the word to comprehend all these ideas.

The sentence to be put in would be like

"Request to free me from the work that I had been assigned today".

"Request to _ from the work that I had been assigned today"

or "Request _ of work that I had been assigned today" or something close to this formulation.

  • 2
    "relieve me from the work assigned ...". relieve: free someone from (a tiresome responsibility) (ODO). – Kris Dec 13 '13 at 6:11
-1

Release or liberate. Liberate is more ideological, release is more legal or relating to protocol.

Of the two I would choose release:

I request release from work.

  • -1 To be released from something is to be set free. In requesting to be exempt from performing a task, job or duty, release is inappropriate. Moreover, you didn't say "the work" but simply work, which means "job". Therefore, your employer could interpret your request as asking for leave. – Mari-Lou A Dec 13 '13 at 20:44
1

Consider relieve as in relieve me of this burden.

  1. a. to ease, lighten, or reduce (pain, anxiety, etc.)

    b. to free (a person) from pain, discomfort, anxiety, etc.

    c. to restore (a part of the body, the mind, etc.) to well-being

  2. a.to lighten the pressure, stress, weight, etc. on (something)

    b. to lighten (pressure, stress, etc.)

  3. a.to give aid or assistance to ⇒ to relieve the poor

    b. to bring or send help to ⇒ to relieve a besieged city

  4. a. to set free from a burden, obligation, grievance, etc.

    b. to remove (a burden, etc.)

  5. a.to set free from duty or work by replacing with oneself or another ⇒ to relieve a nurse

    b. (US, baseball) to serve as a relief pitcher for (another pitcher)

In your constructions, you could use the noun form, relief as in I need relief from this obligation.

1

Exempt comes to mind and may be appropriate here.

Exempt: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/exempt_1
I request you to exempt me from the work assigned to me.

Also I think absolve can be used also, though its most common meaning is to free from a responsibility or guilt.See 2 in the link
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/absolve
I absolve you from the work assigned to you.

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