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Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct?

...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among...

I know that "qualification in" is correct, for example "we are looking for graduates with qualification in maths". But what about "be qualified in"?

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    This should be on ELL: ell.stackexchange.com – Ingmar Dec 11 '13 at 18:11
  • Short answer - yes it's correct. – Mynamite Dec 11 '13 at 18:38
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    Yes, but it's ambiguous between the passive causative and the stative construction. Probably this is a place for become or get instead of be; there are simply too many constructions that use be. – John Lawler Dec 11 '13 at 18:55
  • So I would use become instead of be. Thanks guys (with a special thanks to John!) – Soheil Dec 11 '13 at 20:02
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To my ear it depends upon context:

Qualified in implies that there is a formal process of qualification. For instance, "I qualified in marksmanship."

Qualified for implies that you have satisfied enough requirements to meet criteria. "I qualified for acceptance into the program." "I qualified for a loan."

You can also say "I am qualified for the job." But you wouldn't say "I am qualified in the job." - unless there is a formal process for doing so.

This may have some dialectical variation, and I am speaking strictly from the POV of a native American English speaker. (e.g. I believe the British speak of qualifying in school levels which we do not use in AE.)

As to your usage above: it sounds strange to my ear without context to back it up. As I have said, it largely depends upon how it was meant. If you meant, "I was advanced due to winning" then yes it is correct. If you meant, "I was able to compete because I had the necessary experience," then I would use "qualified for."

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As John Lawler noted in the comments:

Yes, but it's ambiguous between the passive causative and the stative construction. Probably this is a place for become or get instead of be; there are simply too many constructions that use be.

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" qualified " as an adjective can be " qualified to do something":

The purchaser must be legally qualified to own a gun .

" qualification " as a noun:

Does this man really have the qualification to run this office .

  • it is better to check it with dictionaries that is right . – mmb Dec 12 '13 at 10:34
  • This does not answer the question at all, and it is not written in anything that is recognisable as being English. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 18 '14 at 17:04
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Qualify somebody/something for something:

Does this qualify me for citizenship?

  • So do u mean that using "in" in this example is wrong? I know that "qualification in" is correct for example : we are looking for graduates with qualification in maths." So what about "be qualified in" ? – Soheil Dec 11 '13 at 18:15
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    @Soheil To compete in a qualifying round (in sports or tournaments) & get through to a final stage, we'd normally say "qualify for" — My great test scores qualified me for entry into various science Olympiads. "Qualified in" would be fine, but used more for a formal educational/professional certification — After ten long years of night-school, I became qualified in psychology – anotherdave Dec 11 '13 at 22:20
  • This answer does not answer the question. The active, transitive verb is not relevant to the passive, adjectival participle when it comes to prepositions. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 18 '14 at 17:03

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