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Is the phrase "leave all worries" right ? Or should it always be "No worries"

when saying to someone who is disappointed with something ?

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"No worries" is fine in speech, and you would want, perhaps, to follow it with something hopeful, such as,

"No worries; you still have three more tests you can make it up on." - or -

"No worries; there are plenty of fish in the sea."

"Leave all worries" is formal and a bit poetic. It is used in songs; it is common to read it in the phrase "Leave all worries behind you," or the saying, "Leave all your worries at the door." It isn't used much in conversational (AmE) English, except by religious people, who often advise others to "leave all their worries at the foot of the cross."

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  • "No worries; you still have three more tests you can make it up on." - This one was exactly my situation.A friend who had a not so good test and was having exactly 3 more tests remaining.Just curious is there any reason you used the particular example. – justine Dec 6 '13 at 20:47

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