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  • There is an apple and an orange on the table.
  • There are an apple and an orange on the table.

Which is grammatical?

2
  • Yes, "or". Some people use one, and some the other. Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 14:06
  • This exact same example has been posted before. Please search the site before asking. Thank you.
    – RegDwigнt
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 16:53

1 Answer 1

0

Are is preferred with and.
Is is used with or.

2
  • No, not necessarily true. "There is a church and a school in the local village." "There is milk and eggs in the fridge"
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 16:44
  • 1
    Not necessarily not necessarily true. "There are a church and a school in the local village." "There are milk and eggs in the fridge." Surely the deciding factor amongst non-prescriptivists is whether A and B are seen as separate items in a list, or (A + B) is seen as a composite: 'Bacon and eggs are too expensive for most people to be able to afford in Elbonia.' / 'Bacon and eggs is on the menu.' Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 23:13

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