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Which of the following is correct?

  • She doesn't go to school today because she is ill.
  • She didn't go to school today because she is ill.

These are the only choices given.

  • doesn't=>is; didn't=>was - you should visit ell.stackexchange.com – mplungjan Nov 21 '13 at 10:59
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    The question in the title suggests a very basic and dangerous misunderstanding on your part. Absolutely any tense can work with "today". That word does not determine anything at all. – RegDwigнt Nov 21 '13 at 11:51
  • It would prevent distant future and distant past, at least. Not that there's much difference in formulation between distant- and near- time. – Doc Nov 22 '13 at 18:48
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You likely never use "She doesn't go to school today." Does would more likely be used for general cases: "She doesn't go to school most days", "She doesn't go to school on Mondays", "She doesn't go to school [at all]."

Depending on the context of the action (whether you're saying it before school started or after school started - and whether it has finished), you would either use "is", "will not" = "wont" or "did not" = "didn't".

"She is not going to school today." => School has not ENDED yet (may or may not have started), but she will not be going.

"She wont go to school today." => School hasn't started yet, but she will not be going.

"She didn't go to school today." => School has started and she did not go.

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It depends on context.

If it's in the morning, and someone asks why she is not getting prepared for school, you can answer that she is not going to school. An alternative in this case is "she won't be going to school today"

If it's in the evening and someone asks why she is not doing her homework, you can answer that she didn't go to school today.

Without context (e.g. at what time of day the question is asked) I would say both ioptions can be correct.

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Your sentence presents a past action, so it will be correct for your sentence to be in Past Simple.

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