0

I have read something from an author and I think I would like to use part of his idea in my own context. But how should I cite the author so that it isn't misleading? Let me give an example.

Suppose I have read this and wanted to use this idea from Dunne & Raby in my article:

Critical design uses designed artifacts as an embodied critique or commentary on consumer culture.

Since my article is written in my own context, I may end up using the sentence this way:

The design of Product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture.

Now, if I were cite Dunne & Raby:

The design of Product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture (Dunne & Raby, 1999).

This may appear as if Dunne & Raby said that Product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture when they were actually commenting about something more general.

I can't put quotes either since I'm lifting it entirely from its original statement.

Would how I have cited the author correct in the form of APA citation? If not, how should I cite it so that it would be clearer?

4
  • To put it simply, you are not quoting anyone, so you won't be 'citing' anything. If you find a sentence structure suitable to your context, you may use it -- I don't think you need to acknowledge 'inspiration' from another source for that. Remember never to change anything, not even punctuation, if you claim to quote someone. -- Quote exactly or don't quote at all. – Kris Nov 17 '13 at 8:45
  • 1
    Better to ask questions of this type on writersSE. They're OT on ELU. – Kris Nov 17 '13 at 8:46
  • According to Dunne and Raby (1999), the design of Product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture. You might perhaps hotlink; According to Dunne and Raby (1999), the design of Product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 17 '13 at 8:52
  • @ xenon Will you be providing a bibliography? I would definitely include details of Dunne & Raby's work in that. Otherwise I suspect Kris' comment is valid. – WS2 Nov 17 '13 at 9:45
2

The standard way of providing this sort of oblique reference is to use compare, abbreviated to cf.

cf. abbreviation
compare with (used to refer a reader to another written work or another part of the same written work).

Origin:
from Latin confer 'compare'

[ODO]

See also Cornell University's guide.

The first example of use I found using Google uses it to provide Bible references where the reader is directed to supporting text which is not directly quoted. This is the same as your use:

The most common Greek word for “wrath” is orge. The term occurs 36 times in the New Testament (cf. Romans 1:18; 2:5). Source

Thus your reference would be

The design of product X is an embodied critique on the consumer culture (cf. Dunne & Raby, 1999)

You are not directly quoting, so your reference should not give that impression. Cf. provides the mechanism to show that you are basing a statement of your own on other evidence.

0

Just don't cite anyone. Alternatively, you may add "as described above" or something similar.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.