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I am writing a children's book (8–12) and am looking for an idiom or more colorful language to be used in place of the highlighted section.

Now that she’d stumped me, Ms. Sanders, my favorite of the Uniformed Division of the Secret Service and grand master of White House Trivia, would stop. And it’s a good thing too, since quite a line of employees have gathered behind me. They don’t mind waiting while she quizzes me on White House trivia since it means that they will get through without having their lack of trivia exposed.

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    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about writing advice Nov 15, 2013 at 18:22
  • Their ignorance intact from view?
    – WS2
    Nov 15, 2013 at 18:32
  • blissfully without having their ignorance of trivia exposed ...
    – user49727
    Nov 15, 2013 at 22:25

2 Answers 2

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You could use the idiom scot-free, though admittedly it's not a very colorful substitution in my opinion.

They don't mind waiting while she quizzes me on White House trivia since it means that they will get through scot-free.

For something more colorful, maybe create your own simile/metaphor? Example:

They don't mind waiting while she quizzes me on White House trivia since it means that they will get through freely, like fearless mice scurrying past a sprung mousetrap.

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Since the work is for children and you presumably want to leave them a little better off than before they read your book, why not coin a word and define it parenthetically. " . . . since it means that they will get through without having their triviopenia, a lack of knowledge of trivia, exposed."

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