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Looking for a word that someone would use to describe this person.

eg. "Michelle is my __. She's always there when I need her"

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    It's not a single word, but I would say "go to gal" or "go to guy" depending on the gender of the individual. – Lumberjack Nov 7 '13 at 16:08
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    "Rock" is often used in this context. "My dad was my rock through my difficult divorce". – Ste Nov 7 '13 at 16:09
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    @Ste’s suggestion is good, but it should be noted that being someone’s rock specifically implies helping them through difficult, distressing times, being strong as a rock that someone can lean against and shelter from the storm under. It’s a Biblical reference. Lumberjack’s suggestion is more relevant if your need is something less distressing (like asking for information, needing a helping hand with something, simple favours, etc.). A go-to person can also be more specific: “Jamie is my go-to guy for hipster indie music, he’s very into that whole scene”. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Nov 7 '13 at 16:56
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    @JanusBahsJacquet I can't disagree with any of that. – Ste Nov 7 '13 at 16:58
  • If you could use an adjective, she's accessible. – Chris H Nov 7 '13 at 17:07
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I know this is going to sound very prosaic, but how about "friend"?

"You've Got A Friend"

When you're down and troubled
And you need a helping hand
And nothing, whoa nothing is going right.
Close your eyes and think of me
And soon I will be there
To brighten up even your darkest nights.
.
You just call out my name,
And you know wherever I am
I'll come running, oh yeah baby
To see you again.
Winter, spring, summer, or fall,
All you have to do is call
And I'll be there, yeah, yeah, yeah.
You've got a friend.

Complete Lyrics at MetroLyrics

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  • 1
    I think friend might be an especially good candidate if we tweak the sentence a little bit: Michelle is a true friend; she's always there when I need her. – J.R. Nov 7 '13 at 19:25
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Besides a noun, you could go with the now-current idiom using "back", meaning someone standing by watching for danger that might come out of an unexpected direction, or someone who will be there and come forward if needed.

"Michelle has my back. She's always there when I need her"

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Michelle is my saviour 1. She's always there when I need her

Michelle is my anchor. 2 She's always there when I need her

A saviour, a person who rescues you from harm or danger
An anchor, a person or thing that can be relied on for support, stability, or security; mainstay

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0

I would say :

  • Backer
  • Supporter
  • protector
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  • You should add some more information (preferably with links to back up the information) about each of these words and when they are used. Simply listing three words does not help the asker very much, necessarily. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Nov 7 '13 at 17:39
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"Pal" is often used in that context. "Be a pal" implies becoming someone to rely on.

The urban dictionary says something close, as does Merriam Webster. A "close friend" is good, but this says it in one word.

It might not be too far off to say "bosom buddy," though of course that has other overtones as well.

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If the dyad in context is married or , or is a strongly-based business relationship, then said person could be a "Rock".

I just show up for the cameras and the hand-shaking; Gerald, our CFO, is the one who's on the other end of the line when I have the tough questions. He's my rock.

or

Fredrick and I have been through thick and thin time for more than a decade; from our moves across the world, to injuries and every other thing I just couldn't solve. He's my rock and I know he always will catch me.

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I would say the question is phrased incorrectly.

It's specifically asking for a noun. However it "begs" and adjective(it says, "I'd like a noun that implies these traits").

The most concise noun would be a nominalization (in this case, a noun derived from an adjective). Such constructs, however are antithetical to clear expression. An adjective is more direct and clear.

I would suggest:

stalwart

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