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  1. Across the street.

  2. Across the street from ...

  3. Across from the street.

  4. Across from the street from the church.

I know what the first phrase means but I have problem with the rest.

What they mean?

Edit:

Examples:

  1. He argued that it was across from street and I had given wrong address then.

  2. Entrance to the Front Beach across from street from our house.

  3. The two-story, 232,000-square foot facility sprawls on 50 acres along Route 108, across from street from stately mansions erected on...

  4. Hayward stayed at a hotel in South Jersey across from street from the Garden State Racetrack

  • Your added examples don't make much sense. They seem to be missing vital words... – Flimzy Nov 8 '13 at 1:22
2

Although the third example appears in the Baltimore Sun, I think it's a misprint. Similarly for the fourth example from Fight News.

These should say across the street from. I believe that the articles originally used across from — that is, "...sprawls along Rote 108, across from stately mansions..." and "a hotel in South Jersey across from the Garden State Racetrack".

Across from generally means "across the street" because that's the most usual point of reference; but it could be across anything: a river, a park, you name it. The subeditor realised that and attempted to insert street and got it wrong.

3

1) anywhere on the other side of the street.

2) on the other side as seen from a specific location on your side of the street.

3) and 4) They hardly make sense on their own, maybe you have a little context to add?

For example : Nina is an interesting woman who sits across from me at work.

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The added examples of "across from street" all sound simply wrong to me. But I can't rule out the possibility that they would sound OK in some English-speaking places.

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