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Now, although I regard with a hushed and solemn fear, the mysteries, between which and this state of existence is interposed the barrier of the great trial and change that fall on all the things that live; and although I have not the audacity to pretend that I know anything of them; I can no more reconcile the mere banging of doors, ringing of bells, creaking of boards, and such-like insignificances, with the majestic beauty and pervading analogy of all the Divine rules that I am permitted to understand, than I had been able, a little while before, to yoke the spiritual intercourse of my fellow traveler to the chariot of the rising sun.

closed as unclear what you're asking by p.s.w.g, Matt E. Эллен, RegDwigнt Nov 6 '13 at 12:17

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    It is written in an old-fashioned and convoluted style. But rather than expecting us to give you the whole answer, how about you telling us which parts are giving you difficulties? – Colin Fine Nov 6 '13 at 10:07
  • the barrier of the great trial and change – Hamed Nov 6 '13 at 10:08
  • I can no more reconcile the mere banging of doors with the majestic beauty and pervading analogy of all the Divine rules than I had been able, a little while before, to yoke the spiritual intercourse of my fellow traveler to the chariot of the rising sun. – Hamed Nov 6 '13 at 10:10
  • The bits you have selected in reply to me suggest that you are asking about the signification of particular words, rather than the structure of the paragraph. To which I reply that I have no idea what the barrier of the great trial and change means. If I had some idea of the context I might be able to hazard a guess. – Colin Fine Nov 6 '13 at 10:17
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    Ah. In that case, I think that the great trial and change means death. The banging of doors etc I think means popular ideas of ghosts and haunting. – Colin Fine Nov 6 '13 at 10:22
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The great trial and change... is clearly death; the mysteries that are on the other side of it are the truths of eternity (whatever they may be; the author specifically says that he does not pretend to know).

The banging of doors, ringing of bells, creaking of boards, and such-like insignificances appear (in context) to be the phenomena that mediums, parapsychologists and so on adduce to 'prove' that spirits return from the undiscovered country's bournes.

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