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Example usage:

There have been three retransmits.

Is there a more appropriate word?

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  • 4
    Retransmission Nov 5, 2013 at 12:18
  • @MattЭллен retransmit and retransmissions are entire different things in that part of the universe (comms jargon).
    – Kris
    Nov 5, 2013 at 14:09
  • @Kris how so? perhaps you can make the question better? Nov 5, 2013 at 14:12
  • "Neighbor Down: Too many retransmits"; "If no response is received after several retransmits to..."; "Requesting a retransmit from sender: UIP stack can request a retransmit from the application logic"; "...even slightly corrupted data can be processed without having to request a retransmit that delays every subsequent datagram"
    – Kris
    Nov 5, 2013 at 14:20
  • @Kris, would retransmittals, used as a noun (which it can be), be acceptable in comms jargon?
    – JLG
    Nov 5, 2013 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

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Yes. Retransmit is indeed used as a noun. Significantly, the usage is generally to distinguish from the corresponding 'dictionary' noun retransmission.

A given message subjected to retransmission constitutes an entity called a 'retransmit' or an event of 'retransmit':

"Neighbor Down: Too many retransmits"; "If no response is received after several retransmits to..."; "Requesting a retransmit from sender: UIP stack can request a retransmit from the application logic"; "...even slightly corrupted data can be processed without having to request a retransmit that delays every subsequent datagram"; "The sending system A on the one hand recognizes an error of the transmission on too many retransmits."
[from sources]

If you fail at first, attempt a retransmit before raising a ticket
Optimize the message before attempting retransmission, instead of second and third retransmit

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When you retransmit something, you retransmitted a retransmission. So the correct phrasing would be:

"There have been three retransmissions"

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  • retransmits and retransmissions are entirely different things in that part of the universe (comms jargon).
    – Kris
    Nov 5, 2013 at 14:41
  • 1
    I don't see anything related to communications jargon in his question. If he wants an answer on jargon he needs to tag the question with Jargon
    – MilanSxD
    Nov 5, 2013 at 15:08
  • You meant to say, "When you retransmit something, you made a retransmission."
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2013 at 5:20
  • google.com/#q=%22three+retransmits%22
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2013 at 5:24

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