9

I've seen people writing: "Have an Octotastic day!". I've tried to search online, but I didn't get any useful results. From the context I feel it's a synonym for "fantastic". I couldn't see any details on usage of that word. Is it something made-up?

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    Yes, it's made-up. It seems to be a poor portmanteau (poortmanteau?!?) of 'October' and 'fantastic' I'd avoid it. – Jim Oct 31 '13 at 1:52
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    @jim, My research had the word associated with octopi! Lol! – Kristina Lopez Oct 31 '13 at 1:56
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    It's very common for informal writing to add "-tastic" to words to make them sound more effusive. So it's not that October is especially fantastic, but merely that you didn't happen to encounter an occurrence of "Maytastic" or "Junetastic" when their time rolled around. Having said that, I will admit that some months lend themselves to portmanteauing more readily than others. I doubt, for example, that you'll run into an occurrence of "Februtastic," even though February is a truly outstanding month. – Sven Yargs Oct 31 '13 at 2:13
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    @ShobhitPuri- October was my first thought, it could very well be octopi, or octogenarian for that matter. The fact that we don't know means it's probably not something you should use unless the immediate context makes it clear. Have an Octoberiffic rest of the month! – Jim Oct 31 '13 at 2:14
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    @SvenYargs: Can you add your comment to an answer? I think it is a suitable answer to the question. – MrHen Oct 31 '13 at 16:04
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I believe this comes from the GitHub, a cloud based version control system. Their logo is the Octocat, and they often use the phrase "have an octotastic day".

  • If I remember correctly, I saw it somewhere on gitHub only. You are right. – Shobhit Puri Jun 25 '14 at 15:17
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    Yeah, haha. That is where I came from. It is from the Student Discount Request. – Aaron Esau Mar 14 '16 at 3:13
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At MrHen's kind suggestion, I'm submitting my earlier comment as an answer...

It's very common in informal writing for authors to add "-tastic" to words to make them sound more effusive. So it's not that October is especially fantastic, but merely that you didn't happen to encounter an occurrence of "Maytastic" or "Junetastic" when their time rolled around. Having said that, I will admit that some months lend themselves to portmanteauing more readily than others. I doubt, for example, that you'll run into an occurrence of "Februtastic," even though February is a truly outstanding month.

As Jim notes in one of his comments above, the suffix "-rific" (borrowed from "terrific") has a similar tendency to appear as a would-be excitement enhancer in a multitude of settings, as in "lobsterrific" or "ennuirific." Yet another such suffix (somewhat less commonly used) is "-tacular" (borrowed from "spectacular").


Belated acknowledgment: It seems pretty clear to me now that, with regard to the question of where octastic comes from, Bryan's answer is the correct one. I'll keep my answer here live because I think it still has some value in connection with interpreting other words with suffixes like -tastic; but in the specific instance of octastic, Bryan undoubtedly has it right.

2

Yes, it is from GitHub.

It comes from their logo which is an Octocat.

!

2

Yes, GitHub lovers writing: "Have an Octotastic day!"

Because the GitHub platform began on 1 October 2007. As usual for informal writing, add -tastic to make the word sound more effusive.

So we can say:

"Octo" (October) + "-tastic" = Octotastic

Have an Octotastic day! - GitHub Developer

1

The origin of the term comes from Github and his mascot, the octocat. The word acrually is a combination of octopus and fantastic, such words are called portmanteaus.

It appears to be an invented term to increase the awareness about science, octopuses in particular. It would increase our interest in the marine wildlife, but until now it has not reached its purpose...

The actual meaning doesn't exist, but in the broader sense it could mean "have a fantastic day".

  • Cursory web searching reveals that "Mascotte" may be the Dutch word for Mascot, and not a breed of cat. Have I misunderstood? Is "Mascotte" an English word? – jejorda2 Oct 20 '17 at 12:57
  • Sorry, I misspelled the word! It's due to the corrector... I meant the english term mascot, whose meaning can be regarded as a animal or object that is believed to bring good luck or one that represents anorganization – Erik Pillon Oct 20 '17 at 13:42
  • I'm going to EDIT the original amswer... – Erik Pillon Oct 20 '17 at 13:42

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