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As the appreciation of justice and the desire to act to further it, conscience is based on a rational appreciation of the well-orderedness of a benign God's plan for the world. Thomas Acquina on the Passion by Robert Miner

Conscience can appreciate or generate the appreciation of justice, and can generate the desire to promote it, but it is different from them both. So to use the conjunction word “as”, for me, is to reduce conscience to things it generates. Therefore I think the sentence is written loosely. Do you have a better explanation which will do more justice to the author than my version?

  • Sorry, I made a mistake. It has nothing to do with Rousseau. – benlogos Oct 25 '13 at 2:48
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I suspect the second "appreciation" is a typo and what the author meant to write was "apprehension". If I'm right, then ...

As here means approximately "in the capacity of"; the author doesn't say that conscience appreciates or generates appreciation, he says that to the extent that conscience is (among other things) the appreciation of justice and desire to act to promote justice, conscience is grounded in perceiving that God's plan for the world is well-ordered and benign.

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As the appreciation of justice and the desire to act to further it, conscience is based on a rational appreciation of the well-orderedness of a benign God's plan for the world.

It is a clumsy sentence. Here's my paraphrase:

Conscience, being as it is the appreciation of justice and the desire to act to further justice, is based on a rational appreciation of the well-orderedness of a benign God's plan for the world.

I think the sentence would be better rewritten completely. Maybe a different author would be an improvement.

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