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This question already has an answer here:

I know what is the meaning of this.

I know what the meaning of this is.

If the first sentence is considered correct, can someone please explain the reasoning?

Edit:

The answer of the "Changing Subject and Verb" post illustrates my question, not the answer. Another example:

To know whether you are dealing with the main clause or an embedded clause, you have to think about what is the main verb of the whole sentence.

Compared to:

To know whether you are dealing with the main clause or an embedded clause, you have to think about what the main verb of the whole sentence is.

marked as duplicate by RegDwigнt Oct 20 '13 at 19:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This question has been asked numerous times before, e.g. here, here and here. I don't understand how you can say that the answers there don't satisfy you after accepting the exact same answer here. In fact the answer here is much less detailed than the ones on the older questions. – RegDwigнt Oct 21 '13 at 11:23
  • I think I explained why quite clearly above; the best voted answer of the link you provided included a nice explanation, but the first sentence following the explanation included a sentence that completely contradicted the rule that was just explained. Because of this, I thought I must not be understanding it correctly. The other links were very helpful, though. Thank you. – asdf03484 Oct 21 '13 at 13:02
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The first one is wrong: this is an indirect/subordinate/dependent question, which has regular word order (subject-verb), not the inverted order of an independent question with a question mark.

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