1

I have the sentence:

If you had ever fought with A, you know how important it is not to do B.

and I'm not sure if it is really correct. It is supposed to mean, "In case you fought with A in past then you know (from that point in past on) how important it is not to do B". Does the sentence express that correctly?

2

It depends on the timeframe. If you are talking about the situation now, it’s:

If you have ever fought with A, you will know how important it is not to do B.

If you are a talking about the situation in the past, it’s:

If you had ever fought with A, you would have known how important it is not to do B.

  • 1
    It depends on the context, but I think it'd be more common to say “you would know” than “would have known.” – Bradd Szonye Oct 19 '13 at 0:34
1

The main clause has the tense wrong. It should be

If you had ever fought with A, you would have known how important it is not to do B.

Or

If you had ever fought with A, you would know how important it is not to do B.

Note that both sentences imply that the subject has never actually fought with A. If you don't want to imply that and merely wish to express the if-then relationship, you can say

If you have ever fought with A, you (should) know how important it is not to do B.

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