1

Should I capitalize the word "the" when speaking of God as "the/The Lord"?

I praise the Lord.

or...

I praise The Lord.

  • 5
    No. Articles and prepositions are usually not capitalized. In fact, they are usually deliberately not capitalized. e.g. "Revenge of the Nerds". Regardless of religious disposition. Even in Christianity or Judaism, the convention is followed such that the article "the" is but a pedestal/footstool in distinctifying "Lord" or "LORD". – Blessed Geek Oct 14 '13 at 3:03
  • Perhaps it depends on how many Lords you believe there are. If it is just one then a capital T may be appropriate. But is you are Hindu? Who knows? – WS2 Oct 14 '13 at 9:53
  • This is a common error that’s been cropping up increasingly frequently in recent times, where people extend the capitalization of a proper noun backwards into the noun phrase to include its determiner — here, its article. Instead of praising a new aircraft like the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, people instead mistakenly write *The Boeing 787 Dreamliner, and even at times *A Dreamliner. It is very strange. And it is not correct in Standard English. – tchrist Oct 14 '13 at 11:50
  • @tchrist And since you have raised the question of the Dreamliner there was a letter in The Independent (UK national daily)the other day which queried the term 'thermal event'. (The Dreamliner keeps having them.) The correspondent asked whether what happened in 1606 should be renamed 'the great thermal event of London'. – WS2 Oct 14 '13 at 16:45
7

No. Articles and prepositions are usually not capitalized.

In fact, they are usually deliberately not capitalized. e.g. "Revenge of the Nerds". Regardless of religious disposition.

Even in Christianity or Judaism, the convention is followed such that the article "the" is but a pedestal/footstool in distinctifying "Lord" or "LORD".

  • 1
    My dictionary does not recognise 'distinctify'? Do you have one that does? Personally I would have used 'distinguish'. The Oxford Dictionary of English (not the OED) gives as one of its meanings 'Recognise or treat as different: be an identifying characteristic or mark of'. Would that not have covered your usage, avoiding the need to coin a new word not in the dictionary? – WS2 Oct 14 '13 at 10:04
  • @WS2 Urban dictionary actually has two definitions. Have a look at the second one! – TrevorD Oct 14 '13 at 13:42
  • @Trevor D. See answer below, which I have deleted. I intended it as a comment. Apologies. – WS2 Oct 14 '13 at 14:06
  • @WS2 I can't "See answer below" (because you've deleted it). No apologies necessary: I largely agreed with your comment, but decided to see whether I could find the word in a dictionary. I was 'amused' by the second definition, and thought that it nicely complemented your comment about "avoiding the need to coin a new word". [Sorry, we seem to be misunderstanding each other a lot at the moment!] – TrevorD Oct 14 '13 at 14:40
  • @Trevor D. Since writing that I've 'cleanified' the car, and 'carified' the shopping home from the supermarket! My wife and I are about to transportify ourselves to a hostelry where we shall foodify and drinkify our faces with some friends. – WS2 Oct 14 '13 at 16:53
3

Usually--yes--an article is lower-case except at the beginning of a sentence.

However, "The Hague" is the accurate form always, even mid-sentence.

There is no one rule that governs every rare instance, so it's best to consult with source text or experts. My Bible has "the Lord" with the lower-case article mid-sentence.

  • 1
    D'oh, why I never opened up a bible to figure this out on my own is beyond me. – Jackson Apr 20 '14 at 7:15

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