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here is my sentence

This makes the best use of balding resistant hair, most of us have at the sides and back of our head.

The sentence after the comma does not make sense ALONE. However, grammatically speaking, it is a complete sentence. My QUESTION is whether I should regard is a subordinate clause and use a comma, or regard it as a complete sentence and use a colon to join the two sentences?

Thanks

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The words after the comma are "grammatically speaking" not a complete sentence. This is because have (in the sense of possessing) is a transitive verb that must have an object. An object is missing, however, in the words: most of us have at the sides and back of our head.

The way to correct the sentence is to add the object of have via a relative pronoun. The result is:

This makes the best use of the balding resistant hair that most of us have at the sides and back of our head.

  • Not only is 'most of us have at the sides and back of our head.' not a complete sentence, it is ungrammatical here. It would work (with a comma or dash after 'have') as a sensible answer to the question 'How many people have got "balding-resistant" hair?' – Edwin Ashworth Oct 5 '13 at 8:56
  • Of course, it is acceptable (if rather clumsy here) to drop the that from a that-clause. The definite article is needed though, and the comma has to go. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 5 '13 at 9:01
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    Yes, these are other ways to correct the sentence; a semi-colon does not work. – Shoe Oct 5 '13 at 9:46
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A subordinate clause needs to be introduced by a subordinating conjunction, or a relative pronoun, and your example doesn’t have one. If I understand correctly what it is you want to say, then you need to write:

This makes the best use of the balding-resistant hair that most of us have at the sides and back of our head.

  • I'll take balding resistant with or without the hyphen. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 5 '13 at 8:53

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