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I've just woken early from a vivid dream. (must be the local ale - we are in Yorkshire at the moment). I was in an inferno of an industrial kitchen where they were manufacturing 'ready-meals'. One large individual with rolled up sleeves and sweat pouring down his arms was shouting above the din. Portion-sized food was going past on conveyors. Some was going toward ovens and some away from them. The noisy director of operations was shouting instructions for all he was worth. One word that he kept saying baffled me and, I couldn't fathom its meaning. It sounded like 'otwards'. Then I realised that what he was saying was 'hotwards' (he had a Cockney accent so it sounded like 'otwards) meaning in the direction of heat, or the ovens. When I awoke it occurred to me that this might be a good question for you folk. Is 'hotwards' an acceptable word in the English language?

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As much as we like to impose our rules, the reality is that language definitions will eventually follow language usage. New words are introduced into the English language all the time. Start using it. If it catches on, then maybe it'll make it into the Oxford English Dictionary some day. Good luck :-)

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  • Thank you. The possibilities are endless. Skywards, waterwards, dangerwards, pleasurewards etc. – user52780 Oct 2 '13 at 6:52
  • Or perhaps just wards: noun : a section in a hospital for patients needing a particular kind of care from m-w.com ;-) – Jack Ryan Oct 2 '13 at 12:13
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  • (fourth line) "towards oven" ; "toward" is static (very frequent confusion in the USA)

  • why not "ovenwards" ?

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