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I have seen a lot of teenagers nowadays going by the lingo "They see me rollin', they hatin'". I'm sure they use it to address their haters but what does it necessarily imply when they relate themselves to a 'rolling' action?

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  • I think one needs context. Rolling can be riding, sure. But the two do not necessarily go together unless you can provide specific usage.
    – Lambie
    Mar 26 '19 at 15:27
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Rolling could mean driving/cruising around specifically or it could also be taken in a much more general sense to mean "conducting myself (publicly)".

Google around for the expression "that's how I roll". Also see the music video by Chamillionaire "Riding Dirty" - or much better yet, its parody by Weird Al Yankovic: "White and Nerdy".

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It refers to Chamillionaire's song "Ridin". In it the rapper criticizes police for discriminating certain groups of people (afroamericans and latins).

In short, the police sees a black person "ridin" his car, hates him for having his financial condition, supposes a black person only would have such money through crime, then stops him, only to be frustrated by the fact that he is a hard working american citizen.

Nowadays it is commonly used in the internet to refer to "haters", people who blindly criticize certain people or points of view out of pure dogmatism.

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    That answer has already been given, although this does add additional information.
    – Chenmunka
    Jun 13 '17 at 11:41
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Well, at school, people do say it. My little 3rd grade brother says it; I sometimes say it with him. But anyways, I think it means that people are hating because they see you rolling in a car: they see you looking nice and they just can't stop HATIN'. "They see me Rollin', they HATIN'; trying to get me riding dirty" — that's more like they HATIN' because they see me rollin' in a car, they see me riding dirty. That's what it means to me, at least.

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    This is borderline incoherent. "They see me rollin' they hatin" is from a 2005 rap song. Rollin does mean riding in a car, but the "hatin'" refers to the police attitude to the riders, which is not motivated by jealousy. You might consider adding a cite and revising or deleting.
    – deadrat
    Jan 16 '16 at 5:40
  • It's written in a particular vernacular which isn't "standard" English, but it's not Not An Answer.
    – Andrew Leach
    Jan 16 '16 at 11:32
  • This answer has the merit of apparently being from the horse's mouth (a young person, probably still in HS), which I find extremely useful.
    – Lambie
    Mar 26 '19 at 15:26
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"They see me rollin they hatin" refers to the police that are showing hate to black people ridin all nice and dope in their perfect cars.

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    Please support this answer with references.
    – Davo
    Mar 26 '19 at 15:03
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I think it's about jealousy, someone is talking to his jealous haters, saying that I am becoming more famous or wealthier or whatever and you are hating me because you're jealous

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