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I am not sure about the last bit of the following sentence whether it is grammatically correct or not. Isn't the usage of the two words "already" and "yet" tautologous? I think one of each is actually enough to express what I want to say

Thus, to avoid any clashes I would be very grateful if you could inform me about any dates you may have already arranged yet.

Many thanks!

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    Both "have already" and "have not yet" are grammatical, but I think "have ... already ... yet" should never be used. Certainly not the way it's done in that sentence. Drop the "yet". Maybe you could say "I have already watered the tomatoes but not yet the cucumbers," but even that strikes me as of doubtful grammaticality. – Peter Shor Sep 19 '13 at 12:18
  • Please add: what makes you unsure; what research you have already done and how it did or did not help. – MetaEd Sep 19 '13 at 12:21
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    "inform me about any dates you may have already arranged" works and so does "inform me about any dates you may have already arranged but have not yet informed me about". Your version does not work – mplungjan Sep 19 '13 at 12:22
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    Already and yet are in disagreement in this sentence. Has he already arranged the dates? Or has he yet to arrange the dates? – Lumberjack Sep 19 '13 at 13:39
  • Lumberjack hits it spot on.The writer wishes to know about any arrangements the addressee has made or hasn't yet but plans to.That two adverbs are used is due to there being two inquiries; the writer unsuccessfully tried to fold them into one.Nothing wrong with wondering about more than one thing, so the sentence should be: Thus, to avoid any clashes, I would be very grateful if you could inform me about any dates you may have arranged or are yet to arrange. (The adverb 'already' is unnecessary;the perfect aspect subsumes it.Also, both arrange & arranged are needed to avoid bad parallelism.) – Talia Ford Sep 19 '13 at 22:07
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In "you may have already arranged yet" it is not a question of tautology. "Yet" doesn't fit here at all in context with all else that has been written. You can say:

Thus, to avoid any clashes I would be very grateful if you could inform me about any dates you may have already arranged.

The word "yet" in this context pertains to the future, and if you were concerned about future dates you would use it like this:

Thus, to avoid any clashes I would be very grateful if you could inform me about any dates you may yet arrange.

In some cases, a final "yet" is used in a question to help ask if something expected has already been arranged.

Have you arranged any dates yet?

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