2

What is the difference between

Do you have a good time?

and

Are you having a good time?

Thanks

  • None I can think of - the second sounds better since it emphasizes the continuation of the good time – mplungjan Sep 19 '13 at 12:04
3

'Do you have a good time?' would imply having a good time is a regular action. If a person enjoys regularly, than he would answer affirmitively to this question.

As @EdwinAshworth says:

'Do you have a good time?' sounds distinctly unidiomatic without contextualisation such as: 'We often go to the zoo in Stackton Trestle.' - 'Do you have a good time?'

Another instance could be:

"Do you have a good time at school?"

since going to school is a regular action.


'Are you having a good time?' conveys that you are asking if the person is currently having a good time. The person may be living in hell, but suppose he goes to a party and you ask him this while he is enjoying, the answer would be yes.

  • 1
    Yes - and 'Do you have a good time?' sounds distinctly unidiomatic without contextualisation such as: 'We often go to the zoo in Stackton Trestle.' - 'Do you have a good time?' – Edwin Ashworth Sep 19 '13 at 12:51
  • Yes, that's true. I'll add that too :) – mikhailcazi Sep 20 '13 at 10:55

protected by MetaEd Oct 31 '18 at 21:13

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