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For a present participle phrase, I've seen:

  1. Seeking advice from the pros, she visited the website.

  2. She visited the website, seeking advice from the pros.

For a past participle phrase, I've seen:

Advised by the pros, she started her own business.

But not:

She started her own business, advised by the pros.

Does it exist? Thanks.

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Both are correct. It's a matter of emphasis: do you want to make the advice, or starting the business, the main point?

I prefer: "She started her own business, advised by the pros." and

"She visited the website, seeking advice from the pros."

You could even say that it's a matter of style. Some writers like to start sentences with "..ing" verbs (gerunds).

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  • One has to be careful when using these absolute constructions that one doesn't end up with a misplaced or ambiguous modifier: 'She found the goats looking for the sheep.' 'She searched desperately for the men who had still not returned, exhausted by the climb.' Sep 16 '13 at 6:22
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I would suggest that if there is an explicit or causal link between the two actions that the causal or motivating action should come first and resultant action second: "Seeking advice from the pros, she visited the website".

Putting it the other way around brings no benefit over simply joining the phrases together: "She visited the website to seek advice from the pros" vs. "she visited the website, seeking advice from the pros". In the former construction there is clear causality or motivation, while in the latter the comma merely indicates that the two actions are concurrent and not related.

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