-2

Can someone explain the difference between a fact, knowledge and wisdom?

closed as off-topic by TrevorD, Bravo, choster, MetaEd, Matt E. Эллен Sep 5 '13 at 7:58

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – TrevorD, Bravo, choster, MetaEd, Matt E. Эллен
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad. – iterums Sep 4 '13 at 18:26
  • 1
    To attain knowledge, add things every day. To attain wisdom, subtract things every day. -Laozi – iterums Sep 4 '13 at 18:26
  • 1
    @iterums great quote, I was very impressed by your inventiveness until I found it' source :). – terdon Sep 4 '13 at 18:37
  • @terdon I just read that somewhere and found it fitting here. Thanks for the source. – iterums Sep 4 '13 at 18:40
  • 1
    Have you looked this up in a dictionary? If so, what do you find confusing about the definitions? If not, then why not? – TrevorD Sep 4 '13 at 18:49
3
  1. A fact is a single piece of information.

  2. Knowledge is the accumulation of information, techniques, and skills. You may have knowledge of simple facts, such as world capitals, or skills, such as fire making.

  3. Wisdom is generally meant to include the higher order of intelligence that includes judgement, morals, and decision-making.

2

A fact is indisputable. It can be verified repeatedly, and is not subjective.

Knowledge is what you know - know-ledge.

Wisdom is having good judgement, such as being able to judge when to consult a dictionary.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.