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It is common to see 'although' used in the beginning of the sentence, but is it paired with any other word like 'yet'?

We were discussing error correction in class today; my professor explained that while it is alright to use just although, there is nothing wrong with although and yet.

'Although he was bad with calligraphy, yet he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.'

Is this sentence correct?

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    I think it's a bit too effulgent for modern use. – John Lawler Aug 29 '13 at 16:22
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It's archaic, which means that acceptability is declining.

Although he was bad with calligraphy, yet he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.

The yet in that sentence reinforces the trying. A more-or-less equivalent form — but less archaic are more generally acceptable — might be

Although he was bad with calligraphy, still he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.

Because it's essentially there for emphasis, the yet [or still] should be stressed when reading the sentence.

  • I find the yet he sounds stuffy, but still he is not as common there as he still, which sounds perfectly natural. “Even though he was bad with calligraphy, he still tried his best to write her a letter on her birthday.” is how I would say it. The “to her” sounds clunky, too; the indirect object is much more natural to my ear. – tchrist Aug 30 '13 at 2:23
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It does not sound right. The sentence works better without the yet OR without the although

Also I would not use bad in this case

Although his calligraphy was poor, he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.

Or

His calligraphy was poor, yet he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.'

I believe it is a Chinese misunderstanding judging from the posts I find on google

The yet could be an older version of still. I would object less if the yet came after he, making it sound slightly Shakespearean:

Though his calligraphy was poor, he yet/still tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday.'

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    It is indeed a very common mistake made by Chinese people to always include the ‘but/yet’, since it is mandatory in Chinese (as in the sentence from this example: 虽然 他写字写得不好, 但是 过生日的时候 还是 尽力给她写信, in which 虽然 = ‘although’, 但是 = ‘but/yet’, 还是 = ‘still/nonetheless’). – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 29 '13 at 20:20
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    So why was this voted down? I find it incredibly unhelpful when people vote down without commenting – mplungjan Aug 29 '13 at 20:42
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It's rare in modern-day English, but I've been reading some John Locke and he uses the concessive "although-yet" clause frequently.

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    Could you provide a quotation and a source reference? ELU encourages documentation of answers so that they're more than just opinions. – Xanne Apr 16 '17 at 2:02
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The "redundant" yet is an inheritance from scholars who were steeped in Latin. An "although" clause (quamquam) is subordinate to the "yet" (tamen) clause. Quamquam.....tamen = Although....yet

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There is nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence "Although he was bad with calligraphy, yet he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday."

However when you say," although","yet" is automatically implied.Hence "yet" is redundant and hence would not be considered good writing, even though it is accepted writing.

The sentence should be, "Although he was bad with calligraphy, he tried his best to write a letter to her on her birthday."

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