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As I understand, the term wet dreams applies only to masculine gender? Then, unless it's unisex in nature, is there a specific term applicable to feminine gender?

closed as off-topic by MetaEd, TrevorD, Hellion, tchrist, Kristina Lopez Aug 28 '13 at 17:40

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    This is not a gender-specific term. – Zibbobz Aug 26 '13 at 18:15
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    In a literal/biological sense, the phenomenon can only occur in males, so there's no need for a feminine version of the term. – Marthaª Aug 26 '13 at 18:17
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    The same term is used for men and women: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nocturnal_emission – MetaEd Aug 26 '13 at 18:25
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    @Marthaª, why would the phenomenon only be able to occur in males? Women can have ‘wet’ dreams just as well as men can; it is only the mechanism that causes the wetness that differs. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 26 '13 at 20:18
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    @Mari-LouA "... for a male, or lubrication of the vagina for a female". Quote out of context much? – MetaEd Aug 27 '13 at 6:57
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As surprising as it may seem to some, women do have "wet dreams" or, to use the medical term, nocturnal emissions.

I'll certainly agree that the term is used more often when talking about the male experience, perhaps because there are more obvious physiological signs and the fact that wet dreams are pretty much a part of every teenage boy's growing up.

Alfred Kinsey found in his studies that nearly 40% of women interviewed experienced a nocturnal emission, although in women he concluded that the subject perceived climax as a result of arousal whereas, in males, climax was obvious.

So, to answer your question, the term "wet dream" is not gender-specific; it's just more common in a male context.

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