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I am new in this web site!

I would like to know if the following sentence is correct :

Operating systems offer processes running in user mode a set of interfaces that can be used to make requests for privileged operations.

When offer has two objects (here process and set of interface), should one of the objects be preceded by the to preposition?

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    No, you do not need to mark an indirect object with to in English: it’s perfectly normal to toss Jimmy the ball.
    – tchrist
    Aug 12, 2013 at 10:13
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    However, though 'Operating systems offer processes running in user mode a set of interfaces that can be used to make requests for privileged operations.' is not grammatically incorrect, 'Operating systems offer, for processes running in user mode, a set of interfaces that can be used to make requests for privileged operations.' seems more reader-friendly. This is because of the extended nature of the two objects. Aug 12, 2013 at 10:45
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    You might be interested in our sister-site for English learners.
    – tchrist
    Aug 12, 2013 at 10:52
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    Hey, I don't know what it means, just how to do a first-stage decode. Aug 13, 2013 at 9:35
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    @ Edwin Ashworth: It's common to anthropomorphise programs (processes) in computing.
    – Gnubie
    Aug 16, 2013 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

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The sentence is acceptable.

It is an instance of the rule of English grammar that for certain verbs, both of the following formulations are correct:

Subj Verb (IndirectObject) (DirectObject)

I give Jimmy the ball.

OR

Subj Verb (DirectObject) to (IndirectObject)

I give the ball to Jimmy.

In type #2, the 'to' is mandatory, as it would be if your text were modified as follows: Operating systems offer a set of interfaces to processes running in user mode. These interfaces...

However, sometimes formulation #2 is the only acceptable one:

I submit the report to Jane. Correct.

*I submit Jane the report. Wrong.

In fact, I think this is probably true for most verbs; the tricky thing is that it's the most common verbs (offer, sing, give, pass, etc.) that allow for both variations.

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