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Could someone tell me what’s wrong with this sentence?

She also goes on dates with herself, and she ends these nights with bubble baths.

Is the comma here wrong? Any other issues? How would you write it?

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There’s nothing wrong with the syntax or the punctuation, but there may be with the lady.

  • She might be dreaming? – Noah Aug 11 '13 at 9:49
  • "I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms by figure and mood and showing which are valid and which are not." Isn't that a non-parallel structure? "Created" and "Showing." Wouldn't it be better off as: "I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms by figure and mood, showing which are valid and which are not." OR "I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms by figure and mood and showed which are valid and which are not." – Zen Aug 11 '13 at 9:57
  • I should be pleased that you read that far! In my coordinated sentence ‘showing’ is not intended to be a parallel of ‘created’. ‘By figure and mood’ and ‘showing . . .’ both postmodify ‘a full set of 256 Syllogisms’. It is true that they do so using different structures, but I know of no rule of English grammar that forbids that. Separately, the clauses would occur as: ‘I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms by figure and mood’ and ‘I have also created a full set of 256 Syllogisms showing which are valid and which are not’. – Barrie England Aug 11 '13 at 10:41
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    @Zen Your 'comment' appears to be a new question. If appropriate, please make it into a new question. – TrevorD Aug 11 '13 at 16:37
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Barrie England is correct. There is nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence, because "She also goes on dates with herself, and she ends these nights with bubble baths" is a compound sentence (it consists of two independent clauses).

Independent clauses joined by either one of the seven coordinating conjunctions (and, but, or, for, nor, so, yet) must be separated by a comma before the conjunction. Here, the comma correctly falls before "and."

That's why if you were to join the verbs into a single clause ("She also goes on dates with herself and ends these nights with bubble baths"), there would be no comma. Since there are two subjects and predicates (it is two dependent clauses), there is now a comma. "She also goes on dates with herself, and she ends these nights with bubble baths."

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