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I am writing a cover letter for my job application, and I am not sure which preposition is proper to use at a sentence as below. "Hereby, I am applying for the position of AAA (position title) in BBB (company name)."

I am not sure if "in" is the correct one or not. How about "at" or "of", instead of using "in".

  • I am applying for the position of AAA (job title) in BBB (company name).
  • I am applying for the position of AAA (job title) at BBB (company name).
  • I am applying for the position of AAA (job title) of BBB (company name).

And if you can tell me why, I would appreciate. (Using proper preposition is the most difficult part for/to(?) me.)

Thank you in advance!

  • related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/71368/… – JeffSahol Aug 1 '13 at 20:04
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    @JeffSahol, Thank you for the link. Then can I use "for" or "with" in this sentence as well? – Michelle C. Aug 1 '13 at 20:09
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    That is correct, you can use "for" also. For what it's worth, the one distinction that I can see is that "of" would mainly apply to one-of-a-kind jobs, CEO for example. You would tend to say that X is an accountant at BBB, and Y is the CFO of BBB. That is not a hard "rule", though. – JeffSahol Aug 1 '13 at 20:13
  • @JeffSahol, that's a very helpful comment. Thank you a lot. – Michelle C. Aug 1 '13 at 21:15
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    I would definitely not use "in"...never heard it used in this context. Never applied for a CEO job so I'd not use "of", either. "At" is what I'd normally use. "For" or "with" is what I might use after having the job: "I am an accountant with BBB; I do accounting for BBB." (I can't explain the reasoning or rules behind this, just what sounds right to my ear.) – JeffSahol Aug 1 '13 at 23:35
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It depends on the title.

I would like to be the President of the United States

Because there is only one.

I would like to be a Manager at Burger King

Because there are many and that would be where you work.

I would like to be a Senior Airman in the Air Force.

Because you would be a member.

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