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I was wondering whether the following sentence is grammatically correct:

It's remarkable how many ideas for interesting programming projects pop up in your head when what you really should do is to study!

Is to study used correctly? Or should it just be study?

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    . . . when what you really should be doing, is studying. Jul 22 '13 at 17:48
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    Related, though sort of the opposite: “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read”
    – RegDwigнt
    Jul 22 '13 at 18:22
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    This question does not identify a specific point of difficulty with "to study". Questions which just ask "is this right or wrong" are proofreading requests, off topic.
    – MetaEd
    Jul 22 '13 at 19:23
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    Certainly it does, in the usual ELU.SE hamhanded way: is it sposta be when what you really should do is study (with no to)? Or is it sposta be when what you really should do is to study (with to)? And of course the answer is that it doesn't make any difference. Jul 22 '13 at 20:26
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    I don't see why anyone would assume there might be any difference between asking about All you have to do is [to] read and asking about What you really should do is [to] study. So I think this is a duplicate of “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read” Jul 22 '13 at 23:59
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Yes, it is correct, but normally we omit "to" from an infinitive when it isn't serving as a noun phrase. The effect of putting the "to" back in is to make the statement sound very strong. It works quite well if you imagine the speaker raising his/her voice towards the end of the sentence and really punching out those last few words.

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