2

At the top of a bottle of pop, there is a corkscrew pattern into which the plastic cap is twisted, tightened and sealed.

What is the name of this feature of the bottle?

  • 1
    Can you add the results of your own research to your question? – Kristina Lopez Jul 15 '13 at 3:43
  • It's called the top. – Simon Kuang Jul 15 '13 at 5:12
  • In Thai we call it "spiral". – tia Jul 15 '13 at 5:46
7

It depends on exactly what part of the bottle top you mean. If you mean the top part of the bottle having a spiraling bit on it, that is called the finish, specifically an external threaded finish. If you mean just the spiraling thread itself, that is called the external thread.

images of seven examples of threaded bottle tops

There are two parts to a bottle seal: the finish and the closure. The closure is the sealing device; the finish (also called the neck finish) is the part of the bottle that accepts the closure. On a screwtop bottle, the finish’s external thread fits to the cap’s matching internal thread.

There are many other types of finish to accept other closures such as the familiar stoppers (corks), crown caps, etc.

Supporting facts, references, and specific expertise:

  1. http://www.sks-bottle.com/CapNeck.html
  2. http://www.sha.org/bottle/finishes.htm
  3. I buy bottles and caps for a manufacturing business.
7

It's the same feature that's on screws and bolts, a thread.

  • 1
    Can you provide a source? – CodyBugstein Jul 15 '13 at 4:21
  • 2
    Here you go sha.org/bottle/closures.htm#Threaded Closures I give up trying to fix the link...just scroll down to threaded closures in the index of this linked page. – Chris Jul 15 '13 at 4:35
  • 1
    @Chris, please edit the link into your answer instead of adding it via a comment. Make the answer complete enough to stand on its own; then delete extraneous comments. – James Waldby - jwpat7 Jul 15 '13 at 5:33

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