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I would like to know which sentence flows better. This one:

I was a taken aback by Limei's little confession. In spite of her impulsive personality, she seemed like a normal girl, leading a normal life. Could she be more exceptional than I thought?

or this one:

I was a taken aback by Limei's little confession. Other than her impulsive personality, she seemed like a normal girl, leading a normal life. Could she be more exceptional than I thought?

Suddenly, I'm unsure which one to use.

What I want it to say is that, except for her impulsiveness, Limei seems like a normal person.

  • They mean different things, so what do you want it to be? – Matt E. Эллен Jul 5 '13 at 11:04
  • @MattЭллен What I wanted to say is that, except for her impulsiveness, Limei seemed like a normal person. – janoChen Jul 5 '13 at 11:07
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Considering what you want to say, other than is perfect. You can also say, "Besides her impulsive personality.."

In spite of her impulsive personality means she hardly behaves as a normal girl, which has taken you aback. Whereas, Other than her impulsive personality means she is usually both impulsive and humble in her way of living.

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"Other than ..." means "except for ..." - and is far less 'harsh' or 'condemning'.

If wanting "in spite of", I would actually use "Despite her impulsive personality", but both of these options implies that her impulsiveness is a major character defect.

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