0

I think this is quite a simple question but one I have found no answers for.

In regards to a tilde, I believe it can be used as an abbreviation for "about". For example ~5 translates to "about 5" (an approximation)!

Assuming this is correct, in regards to using the tilde with a currency, should it come before or after the symbol when the currency symbol comes before the value.

For example, should it be

~£5 ~$5

or

£~5 $~5

I assume the first approach is better (the second approach seemed unnatural whilst writing it out) but I can't find anything which states this to be so.

  • The internationally recognized nomenclature and technical descriptions of currencies, are codified in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard ISO_4217. This includes rules around the placement of currency symbol. Ref en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_4217 – MikeRoger Mar 9 '17 at 14:52
5

The currency symbol should be immediately adjacent to the digits, unless there are spaces for column-alignment purposes.

£5.00
£13.50

£   5.00
£  13.50

Where there are no spaces, any sign should not separate the symbol from the amount:

−£5.00
~£5

Where there are spaces in a table, any such sign should be where it makes most sense. Generally this will be next to the figure itself, either on the left or (perhaps more often) on the right:

£    5.00-
£  134.00
  • Good answer, though could perhaps be extended to address symbols (such as all ISO codes, and many local symbols) that appear to the right. – Jon Hanna Jun 7 '13 at 13:42
1

I agree with @Andrew Leach that the currency symbol should be immediately adjacent to the digits.

The internationally recognized nomenclature and technical descriptions of currencies, are codified in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard ISO_4217. This includes rules around the placement of currency symbol.

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