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What is the difference between huge and big?

For example:

  • He made a huge difference to the team. He made a big difference to the team.

Is there a difference in meaning?

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    Huge is bigger than big. Huge is very big.
    – TrevorD
    May 23, 2013 at 10:54
  • @TrevorD ok that means when i say he made a huge difference to the team it means it is very big part and when i say he made a big difference to the team it is just a big part of it
    – NetStarter
    May 23, 2013 at 10:56
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    Yes. If you are actually saying the words (not just writing them), people sometimes say huge difference when being 'polite'. But in that case (in British usage), emphasis on the words can make a difference. If you say He made a HUGE difference ... with the emphasis on "HUGE", you are emphasising his contribution as bigger than others, but if you just say He made a huge difference ... with no extra emphasis on "huge", then it's just 'polite'.
    – TrevorD
    May 23, 2013 at 11:41

1 Answer 1

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[I'm posting my previous comments as an answer as that seems to have been accepted by OP.]

Huge is bigger than big: huge means very big.

But huge can sometimes be used 'politely' just to mean big.
For example, if you were to read the expression:

He made a huge difference to the team

you might well think he had made a bigger difference to the team than did many of his colleagues.
On the other hand, if someone were to speak those words (e.g. at a farewell presentation), the meaning may well depend on the emphasis of the speaker.
If the speaker says:

He made a huge difference ...

with the emphasis on "huge", he would most likely be emphasising that the person's contribution was indeed bigger than that of others. But if he just says:

He made a huge difference ...

with no extra emphasis on "huge", then he is probably just being 'polite'.

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