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In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the sentence loses its intended meaning.

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    possible duplicate of What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”? – tchrist Apr 26 '13 at 16:51
  • Or possibly What exactly is an adverb? – Andrew Leach Apr 26 '13 at 17:03
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    I have to say this is a very strange question, because unlike other people wondering about such things you're actually aware of the easy test, and have already performed it, and concluded that it can't be a noun... and now are still thinking it could be one. I have to ask: why? And what, then, was the purpose of the test in the first place if you won't accept the results you get? – RegDwigнt Apr 26 '13 at 17:47
  • Neither of these previous answers deal with the change of meaning when "here" is substituted by a noun. In the sentence "I am here," "here" can be substituted with "in the wardrobe," which could be regarded as an indirect object or a prepositional clause (I am not clear as to which it is). When "here" is acting as the subject of a sentence, e.g., in the wardrobe is a sentence I made earlier, can it still be regarded as a noun? (Maybe, – RoDaSm Apr 26 '13 at 18:00
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    Here is not an adverb or a noun It is a preposition. – Araucaria - Not here any more. Feb 21 '15 at 11:25
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John Lawler notes in a comment on a different answer here:

Alas, no. It's still an adverb. The construction Here/There is/are Noun Phrase allows the adverb to be fronted, with the subject Noun Phrase moved to the end, as the new information. It's said either referring to a physical place (pointing is appropriate), or metaphorically to refer to things that are being said in the conversation. Here is X generally means 'The next thing I say is X'.

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  • If "here" is used as location, as in "I am still here", then I do not understand by what reason it is not considered a noun. Furthermore, I do not understand what it modifies in the example above. Perhaps this is one of those weird situations in the English language where we have a made up rule that became a tradition. – user277459 Jan 21 '18 at 15:33
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according to dictionary.com, the word 'here' can be a noun as in this example "It's only a short distance from here."

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the sentence, "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier" is a type of run-on sentence known as a comma splice. correctly written it should read. "I hope you are all paying attention. Here is a sentence I made earlier." Rewritten correctly, "Here" becomes the subject of the second sentence and thus, a noun

looking at it a different way, an adverb is a word that modifies a verb. In either the original sentences or my rewritten version "Here" is not modifying a verb or anything else for that matter and thus is not an adverb.

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You're correct, "here" is a noun.

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    Alas, no. It's still an adverb. The construction Here/There is/are Noun Phrase allows the adverb to be fronted, with the subject Noun Phrase moved to the end, as the new information. It's said either referring to a physical place (pointing is appropriate), or metaphorically to refer to things that are being said in the conversation. Here is X generally means 'The next thing I say is X'. – John Lawler Apr 26 '13 at 17:37
  • Thanks, John Lawler, but your answer is a little confusing for me. – RoDaSm Apr 26 '13 at 18:23
  • Jonn Lawler is saying that Here is my car has exactly the same components as My car is here. And he debunks both the noun and adverb theories for here in either permutation in tchrist's link above. And he would probably not agree with my labelling here's word class in this usage as locative particle, as he concentrates on constructions. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 26 '13 at 18:37
  • Thanks, Edwin, but I really didn't get it as I don't know what a locative partiple is, but I'm on to it right now and hope to be familiar with the term very shortly. – RoDaSm Apr 26 '13 at 18:45
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    You probably won't find the term - the argument still rages. Most people interested in this field try to use a word-class structure to help with the analysis of English, but most don't agree on which one to use. Many would admit that classifying this usage of here as either noun or adverb is counter-intuitive and counter-productive; if anything, John is here models on John is cold, where the extra information is about John rather than the 'being' (ie existing) - and so adjectival. But moving to John came here; John is home (now), we see that the label 'adjective' is also wrong. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 26 '13 at 18:55

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